Integrated Weed Management…

Leafy spurge seedset JK WEB05592F02-WebWhen we think of weed control I would say the everyday thought would most likely be the use of chemicals as it relates to the elimination of weeds. To combat weeds -at least on a large scale- a more diverse approach is needed.That is where integrated weed management has been introduced to a more custom approach.Basically it is a” combination of multiple management tools to reduce a pest population to an acceptable level while preserving the quality of existing habitat,water,and other natural resources”The concept includes biological,mechanical,and chemical management practices to control pests.

The biological component uses plant feeding insects that are specific to a weed-most likely noxious or invasive-species.The idea is that the insects will not eliminate the weeds 100% but bring them under control with the landscape.It is a long term process as it may take time to get the insect population established.All with the idea to reduce costs. An example where biological control can be used is in sensitive area where chemicals are not viable-waterways.This approach was used in Idaho along the banks of the Teton River where environmental regulations prevent spraying during high flows.Flea beetles were used to combat leafy spurge-euphorbia esula.Other insects used are red headed spurgr stem borer,gall midge, and spurge clearwing moth.The idea is that it takes time to establish a colony-5000 insects to get started!Hey there is more than one way to skin a weed.

http://www.capitalpress.com/

http://www.mda.state.mn.us/plants/pestmanagement/weedcontrol/whatisiwm.aspx

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